What is the spirit meaning of Falcon?

peregrine falconThere are 37 species of falcon throughout the world. They all share the same basic meaning, but each one will differ a little bit. If Falcon has flown into your life, you’ll want to find out what species it is and research that species’ unique features.

Vision and Focus: Spirit of Higher Purpose

For now I’m going to concentrate on the Peregrine Falcon, since it is probably the most well-known. This is largely because it has an incredibly large range – one of the largest distributions of any bird. The name “peregrine” means “Wanderer.” This small raptor is found on every continent of the world except Antarctica. As the name implies, it will often migrate for incredibly long distances.

The Peregrine Falcon is quite possibly the fastest creature on record. Like all falcons, it has long, tapered wings for superior agility in flight. It uses its keen eyesight to locate its prey – typically songbirds, pigeons and even ducks. Once it spots its target it acts swiftly and decisively. The Falcon swoops and dives for its prey, which it slams into beak-first (unlike most raptors which grasp their prey with their feet.)

So, some of the important Falcon keywords are Vision (especially Higher Vision) and Focus. This makes Falcon an excellent life’s purpose totem. If Falcon appears to you, take note of any shift you may be experiencing in your life. Its appearance may be pointing the way for you towards following your dharma (harmonizing your life with your higher self.) Respect your deepest intuitions regarding which way Falcon is pointing you to go.

The Wisdom of EconomyBlogging from A to Z Challenge

It takes a lot of energy for a Falcon to pursue and catch its prey. As a result, it doesn’t waste its efforts. First, it has to make the executive decision whether a particular target is worth pursuing. Once it decides on its target, it doesn’t waste energy in indecision. Nor does it work harder than it has to. Instead, it aligns itself with the force of gravity to attain speeds of over 200 mph – faster than a bullet train at top operating speed.

Even when the hunt is over, the Peregrine Falcon reserves its power and energy for where it’s most needed. Rather than spend time and resources building nests, it lays its eggs in abandoned nests of other birds or in simple scrapes dug into the sides of cliff ledges. Peregrines are very adaptable and will also nest on skyscrapers in urban areas.

Falcon teaches us to choose our life’s goals wisely, to go with the flow in pursuing them, and to avoid distractions that may keep us from pursuing them effectively.

Symbol of Resilience and Hope

One last note about the Falcon: like all raptors, it is at the top of the food chain, which means that toxins in the prey can easily build up to dangerous levels in its system. In the 1970’s, DDT and other pesticides in the environment posed a serious threat to Peregrine Falcons. The toxin weakened their eggshells to the point where the birds had trouble reproducing. They even went locally extinct in many areas, including most of the U.S.

Fortunately, Peregrine Falcon populations are now rebounding due to recovery efforts including pesticide bans and breeding and reintroduction programs. This magnificent bird is once again a common sight. I believe that its comeback mirrors a major shift in planetary consciousness, in which humanity is beginning to recognize and honor its higher spiritual purpose.

What do you think?

Did you enjoy this post? Christie

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Bee in your Heart (Chakra Meditation)

New painting…

Bee Heart Honeycomb Because our  new hound dog, Melvin, has not come howling up with a stinger in his nose, I am guessing that my recent bee visitor is gone for good.  However, she did bring an invigorating infusion of Bee energy into the studio. It’s quite the buzz!

I’ve been playing with the idea of the Bee as symbol for the Power Center, or solar plexus chakra, and have been wanting to get it down as a painting. Today seemed like the day to do it.

So I grabbed a little watercolor board and got to work. (This painting is quite small – just 4″x4″. It seemed about right for a bee.)

The Power Center grooves on yellow and gold – fitting, because gold also represents money, power in its abstract. This is probably why so many spiritually conscious people have issues with their Power Center. It’s easy to look at the way power is abused in the world and not want a thing to do with it.

But really, that’s kind of a backwards way to look at it. Abuse of power – whether you are the abuser or the abused – is simply a symptom of imbalance of personal power. NOT claiming your true inner power will not fix it.

Of course, money is optional where true power is concerned. It’s just one way in which power expresses itself. It also happens to be extremely convenient, so why not be open to manifesting it when appropriate? Being well funded can certainly help you live your dreams.

Which, if your Power Center is well-balanced, shouldn’t lead to abuse. And, if your heart is in the right place, it will likely bring good fortune to others as well.

Speaking of hearts…

Somewhere in the middle of painting this piece I began to feel something else was needed. The bee was taking form nicely atop the cells of golden honeycomb, but it just seemed…ungrounded. It seemed like it needed something to tie it together.

Perhaps an oval shape framing the bee? No, that wasn’t quite it. Then I held my hands in a heart shape over the bee. Ahhh. That felt right. And a bit of pinky purple was just right to balance out all that yellow.

Once the heart was in place the meaning was clear…

True power is centered in the heart!

 

For more information about Bee in your Heart, click here.

Did you enjoy this post? Anne

Messenger Bee

A magical thing happened in the studio yesterday. And it had nothing to do with paint.

I was just wetting the crease of a folded piece of watercolor paper in preparation for tearing it in half, when I glanced down and saw something crawling across the studio floor. At first I thought it was a humongous spider, but on closer inspection, it turned out to be…

A bee!

A honeybee, I think. Of all the odd things to show up in January, in the middle of a big old building in the U.P. of Michgan.

I stooped down and set my finger down in front of her. She climbed on readily.

bee on finger

Up close, I could see each joint of her six legs, shiny black like her oval eyes. Two sets of transparent wings jutted sleekly from her fuzzy thorax. Her segmented abdomen throbbed rhythmically as she paused, tasting my skin, then ceased as she continued her slow march along my finger. She looked weary, emaciated.

I suddenly needed reassurance that I could get her off if need be, so I placed the bristle end of my Chinese brush in her path.  It was still wet. I thought she might not like that, but she climbed on obligingly. Then, delicately, she lowered her proboscis to the wet bristles and began to drink.

fuzzy bee photo
This photo is as fuzzy as the bee herself, but you should be able to make out my little bee on the brush bristles.

 

Who knows how long it had been since she had had water? She drank and drank, and I began to wonder if she might be hungry, too. I carried her slowly to the kitchen, fetched a chopstick from the drawer and extracted a drop of honey from the jar on the shelf. Yes, she was hungry. She ate purposefully.

While she ate and drank, I tried to capture her image. My phone camera rebelled against focusing on such a small object, but alas, the other camera’s battery was dead. I shifted the brush to my left hand and drew a series of quick sketches from multiple angles.

bee sketches

As I drew, I realized that this bee brought the answer to a question I had recently sent out to the universe. In fact, she was the answer!

I am working on the idea of creating a series of seven power animal paintings, one for each of the seven major chakras, or body/mind energy centers. The animals for some of the chakras came to me right away. Others are taking their sweet time to show themselves. Not surprisingly, I’d been struggling with finding an animal to represent the third chakra, the Power Center. This is an area I’ve definitely had issues with for a long time – lifetimes – and which I’ve recently started working on unblocking. In fact, that very morning I had spent 40 minutes in a power center-clearing exercise before getting to work…

As I drew my little friend, I suddenly realized – of course! – that the bee’s yellow color, her confidence and her disciplined devotion to purpose are all perfectly suited to represent 3rd chakra energy.  She had come to volunteer as the Power Center animal for my painting. 🙂

When the bee had had her fill she retreated to the end of the bristles and washed her face and legs. Wanting to get back to my task, I set her, brush and all, amongst the leaves of my plant.

bee on plant

A single bee in the middle of winter is not likely to live long. I figured she would probably never fly again, but she might enjoy feeling living leaves under her little feet.

I finished halving the sheet, but instead of starting the painting I’m planning to use it for, I was drawn again to check on the bee. I watched her struggle up a slippery leaf. She slipped back, regained her footing, then slipped again, tumbling to the windowsill below.

bee on windowsill

Once again, I placed my finger in front of her and she climbed on. She stayed there a while, gathering her strength…

Then, in a moment, she launched into flight.

Bee in flight sketch

My bee circled once about my head, then, suddenly, she was gone. But what a gift she had brought!

And I wonder…how many other spirit messengers have come into my life, and I never knew it, because I didn’t take the time to listen?

Did you enjoy this post? Anne

Mama bear and cubs

Black bears come in many different colors, from black to all shades of brown, even creamy white. Non-albino white black bears are found almost exclusively in British Columbia and are also known as “Spirit Bears.” In Native American legend, the white color of these bears is said to be a reminder of past ice ages. The white bears are also said to stand for harmony and peace.

Did you enjoy this post? Anne

Mama bear and cubs watercolorLast summer on a car trip through northern Wisconsin I happened to look out the window in time to see a mother black bear with her three cubs. What a thrill!

The ones I saw were actually black, or nearly so, but black bears come in many different colors, from black to all shades of brown, even creamy white. Non-albino white black bears are found almost exclusively in British Columbia and are also known as “Spirit Bears.” In Native American legend, the white color of these bears is said to be a reminder of past ice ages. The white bears are also said to stand for harmony and peace.

We don’t have spirit bears where I live in the U.P. of Michigan, but somehow the little cub in the center just wanted to be white. Its playful expression is perhaps a reminder that we need a little fun in our lives now and then in order to maintain harmony and peace in our lives!

Did you enjoy this post? Anne

Bears!

My dad seems to have bear energy. I’m staying at his house for a few days and keep wanting to paint bears.

Here is the first one.

Bear painting 1
“Bear 1″, original watercolor painting, 7″x10”

Here is the second. (I like the first one better.)

Bear painting in watercolor
“Bear 2″, original watercolor painting, 7″x10”

I used a very limited primary color palette for these, and did most of my color mixing on the paper.

I have started a third, of a sow bear with cubs. It’s still in progress, but will post when done!

Did you enjoy this post? Anne